To Believe God Gave Israel To Jewish People

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Is those two opening words of that tweet a prayer? Or is it a use of the name of Jesus (God) in vain? If the jews that Ben Wizner here mentions are indifferent to blasphemy I wouldn’t count them as jews in this stats.
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A Mondoweiss Collage (With Songs From A Bob Dylan Setlist In Tel Aviv)

“I hereby acknowledge the remarkable rise of Jews inside the U.S. establishment in the last generation. Let’s just look in my field of law. Three Jews sit on the Supreme Court. A Bush Administration attorney general was an Orthodox Jew, and another Jew ran the Bush OLC. Jews are around 25% of all law professors, and are among the most influential professors on the far left (e.g., Brian Leiter), liberal left (e.g., Cass Sunstein), and libertarian right (e.g., Richard Epstein). Some of the most influential lower court judges, including the liberal Stephen Reinhardt, the conservative libertarian Alex Kozinski, and the eclectic Richard Posner are Jews. And of course most of the contributors to the leading law professors’ legal blog are Jews. Jews are doing very well in the United States. Yay! Good for American Jews, and good for America.

But my post wasn’t about denying that Jews have joined and thrived in the American establishment (heck, even the founder of a leading American anti-Jewish hate site is a Jew).” (http://wapo.st/1HLXIYW)

 

“Mondoweiss is an independent website devoted to informing readers about developments in Israel/Palestine and related US foreign policy. We provide news and analysis unavailable through the mainstream media regarding the struggle for Palestinian human rights. Founded in 2006 as a personal blog of journalist Philip Weiss, Mondoweiss grew inside the progressive Jewish community and has become a critical resource for the movement for justice for Palestinians.” (http://bit.ly/1MDkqKY)

“Philip Weiss is an American journalist who co-edits Mondoweiss (“a news website devoted to covering American foreign policy in the Middle East, chiefly from a progressive Jewish perspective”[3]) with journalist Adam Horowitz.[3][4] Weiss describes himself as an anti-Zionist and rejects the label “post-Zionist.”[5]

[3 ]About: Mondowiess

[4] Phil Weiss at Mondoweiss.

 

“It’s normal for members of a community – imagined or not – to attend to the facts and stories of their daily lives and the lives of people who are like them. The broadening and fragmentation of the media landscape enables and encourages the phenomenon. Sites like this one even help drive the development of new communities.

Yet, one consistent and durable criticism of the Jewish-Israeli left goes to its bewilderingly myopic perspective. It’s not so much an inability to see other people. Rather, it’s the tendency to see others as objects (or rarely, agents), situated within a narrative of self. A preening egoism adorns every “humane” pronouncement about the need to end the occupation. Don’t you see? Apartheid undermines the very essence of our whatever and etc…

Fine, one group of people is painfully self-involved and grandiose. Why is that important?

In other circumstances it wouldn’t matter: like a whole culture dedicated to bathroom selfies. But in the apartheid context it matters a lot. The dehumanization of other people occurs through the extraordinary status we afford ourselves or through the denigration of others. For the Jewish-Israeli left it’s the former, for the right it’s both.”(http://bit.ly/1VxY2G6)

 

“Taylor: “When responsibly understood, the implications of deconstruction are quite different from the misleading clichés often used to describe a process of dismantling or taking things apart. The guiding insight of deconstruction is that every structure – be it literary, psychological, social, economic, political or religious – that organizes our experience is constituted and maintained through acts of exclusion. In the process of creating something, something else inevitably gets left out.”Leiter: This isn’t an insight, it’s a tautology. Necessarily, every X excludes not-X, else it would not be X. As even Professor Taylor notes: “something else inevitably [i.e., necessarily] gets left out.” (Whether as an hypothesis about the fundamental workings of language–as Saussure originally conceived it–it is a more substantial hypothesis is a different question, not implicated in Taylor’s formulation.)” (http://bit.ly/1SpPdx5)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSN1ZD1geE0&list=PL6C92A468FAF94250&index=8″Jews are around 25% of all law professors, and are among the most influential professors on the far left (e.g., Brian Leiter), liberal left (e.g., Cass Sunstein), and libertarian right (e.g., Richard Epstein).” (http://wapo.st/1HLXIYW)

Derrida on Levinas on Israel

But today
Sinai
is also,
still in relation
to the singular
history
of Israel,
a name
from modern
ity. Sinai,
the Sinai:
a metonymy
for the border
or frontier
between
Israel and
the other nations,
a front and a frontier
between
war and
peace,
a provocation
to think
the passage between
the eth­
ical, the messianic,
eschatolo
gy,
and
the political,
at a mo­
ment
in the history
of humanity
and of the Nation-State
when
the persecution
of all these
hostages-the
foreigner,
the immigrant
(with
or without
papers)
, the exile,
the
refugee, those
without
a country
, or a State, the
displaced
person
or popula
tion
(so many
distinctions
that call for
careful
analy
sis)-seems,
on every
continent,
open
to a
cruelty
without
precedent.
Levinas
never
turned
his eyes
away
from this violence
and this distress,
whether
he
spoke
of it directly
or not, in one way or another.

Envoy to Palestine By Yusef Komunyakaa

Envoy to Palestine

By Yusef Komunyakaa

I’ve come to this one grassy hill
in Ramallah, off Tokyo Street,
to a place a few red anemones
& a sheaf of wheat on Darwish’s grave.
A borrowed line transported me beneath
a Babylonian moon & I found myself
lucky to have the shadow of a coat
as warmth, listening to a poet’s song
of Jerusalem, the hum of a red string
Caesar stole off Gilgamesh’s lute.
I know a prison of sunlight on the skin.
The land I come from they also dreamt
before they arrived in towering ships
battered by the hard Atlantic winds.
Crows followed me from my home.
My coyote heart is an old runagate
redskin, a noble savage, still Lakota,
& I knew the bow before the arch.
I feel the wildflowers, all the grasses
& insects singing to me. My sacred dead
is the dust of restless plains I come from,
& I love when it gets into my eyes & mouth
telling me of the roads behind & ahead.
I go back to broken treaties & smallpox,
the irony of barbed wire. Your envoy
could be a reprobate whose inheritance
is no more than a swig of firewater.
The sun made a temple of the bones
of my tribe. I know a dried-up riverbed
& extinct animals live in your nightmares
sharp as shark teeth from my mountains
strung into this brave necklace around
my neck. I hear Chief Standing Bear
saying to Judge Dundy, “I am a man,”
& now I know why I’d rather die a poet
than a warrior, tattoo & tomahawk.

Yusef Komunyakaa, “Envoy to Palestine” from The Emperor of Water Clocks. Copyright © 2015 by Yusef Komunyakaa.  Reprinted by permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Lawrence Weiner In Israel

Weiner: “The picture-frame convention was a very real thing. The painting stopped at the edge. When you are dealing with language, there is no edge that the picture drops over or drops of. You are dealing with something completely infinite. Language, because it is the most non-objective thing we have ever developed in this world, never stops”.

Lawrence Weiner, Exhibition View

Golda Meir Said Palestinians Do Not Exist. She Has A Top Score At jewornotjew.com

They Do Not Exist (Laysa lahum wujud) was directed by Mustafa Abu Ali in 1974, who took his title from the remark made by Golda Meir that the Palestinians do not exist. Abu Ali, one of the first Palestinian filmmakers and founder of the PLO’s film division, began making films in 1968 in Jordan, along with Sulafa Jadallah and Hani Jawhariya. After Black September, Abu Ali and the others had to leave Jordan but continued making resistance films in Lebanon.

Abu Ali was able to return to Palestine after the signing of the Oslo Accords, following 47 years of exile as a refugee. However, he is forbidden by Israeli law to live in, or even visit, his hometown of Maliha (in the Jerusalem district) and must live in Ramallah — only 15 kilometers away. Maliha was attacked in July of 1948 and partially demolished by the Zionist forces. All the inhabitants, including Abu Ali, were ethnically cleansed and became refugees never allowed to return to their homes. Today, most Israelis know the area only as the Malcha Shopping Mall or Kenion.

Abu Ali’s contribution to Palestinian cinema is significant, as well as his contribution to international cinema. He worked with Jean-Luc Godard, who always said his soul is Palestinian, on the acclaimed film Ici et Ailleurs. Godard is “a great filmmaker; dedicated, creative and imagnitatve. We were both concerned to find the right film language appropriate to the struggle for freedom,” says Abu Ali.

(source: http://ubu.com/film/abu-ali.html)

#Godard #JeanLucGodard #Palestine #newwave #cinema

Here and Elsewhere (French: Ici et Ailleurs) is a 1976 documentary film by Jean-Luc Godard and Anne-Marie Miéville, made using footage from Jusqu’à la victoire, a 1970 pro-Palestinian film made by Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin as part of Dziga Vertov Group.

Ici et Ailleurs marks the beginning of Godard’s transitional period, which found him experimenting with video and moving from political polemics to an examination of the way people perceive themselves and others; as such, it shares many of the traits of both his radical-era films and the video-centered work that followed while simultaneously providing a critique of the Dziga Vertov Group’s ideas and methods. It is also one of his first projects with Miéville, who has remained the major collaborator in his life and work since. (wikipedia)